Frequently Asked Questions

View our FAQs for students, faculty, seminar participants, and course consultants.

Students

How can I take a Sunoikisis course?
How can I get credit for taking a Sunoikisis course?
Who is eligible to participate in Sunoikisis courses?
What other student programs does Sunoikisis offer?
Who is eligible to participate in the Sunoikisis student programs?
Is funding support available to students for the Sunoikisis programs?
How can I join your mailing list?
My question isn’t here. What can I do?

Faculty

How much does Sunoikisis cost?
What are the obligations of participating faculty and institutions?
Can I use the materials I find on the website?
Who participates in Sunoikisis?
What institutions are affiliated with Sunoikisis?
How do students receive credit for Sunoikisis courses?
How can I get my institution to recognize a Sunoikisis course?
How does the Sunoikisis program impact small departments?
What happens at the course planning and faculty development seminars?
Who is eligible to participate in course planning and faculty development seminars?
Is funding support available to faculty to participate in the course planning seminars?
My question isn’t here. What can I do?
How can I join your mailing list?

Seminar Participants

When is the next seminar?
When will the application be available?
Who is eligible to attend?
What is my specific contribution to the planning seminar?
When will the seminar agenda be posted?
When will the course syllabus be posted?
What does a typical day look like?
How do I get to the Center for Hellenic Studies?
Where can I park if I am driving?
What does the Center for Hellenic Studies provide?
Where will I be staying?
What do I need to bring?
Can I bring my family?
What funding is available to seminar participants?
Is the CHS library available to seminar participants?
Will I have access to wireless internet?
Why do I need to sign a media release form before participating?

Course Consultant

What is expected of me before the seminar?
What is expected of me during the seminar?
What is expected of me after the seminar?
What are my teaching requirements in the course for the fall?
When will the seminar agenda be posted?
When will the course syllabus be posted?
How do I get to the Center for Hellenic Studies?
What does the Center for Hellenic Studies provide?
What does a typical day look like?
Where will I be staying?
What do I need to bring?
Can I bring my family?
What funding is available to seminar participants?
Is the CHS library available to seminar participants?
Will I have access to wireless internet?
Why do I need to sign a media release form before participating?

Students

How do I take a Sunoikisis course?

You will need to work with an instructor at your home institution to participate in one or both of the Sunoikisis courses in the Fall term.

How can I get credit for taking a Sunoikisis course?

Neither Sunoikisis nor the Center for Hellenic Studies may award credit. It is up to your home institution whether you receive official credit for your work in Sunoikisis. You will need to work with an instructor at your home institution to participate in one or both of the Sunoikisis courses in the Fall term; you can talk with your instructor about receiving official credit from your institution. You must be enrolled at an institution which has decided to recognize the work you complete in the Sunoikisis course.

Who is eligible to participate in the courses?

Anyone is eligible to participate in the courses, as long as you work with a sponsoring instructor at your home institution.

What other student programs does Sunoikisis offer?

Sunoikisis offers a travel-study program every January in Greece and also hosts an undergraduate research symposium once a year at the Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC. Students are also eligible to apply for three summer programs: the Kenchreai Archaeological Fieldwork, the internship program at the Center for Hellenic Studies in Nafplion, Greece, and the internship program at the Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC.

Who is eligible to participate in the Sunoikisis student programs?

Any undergraduate from an institution in the United States is eligible to apply for Sunoikisis programs, symposia, and internships.

Is funding support available to students for the Sunoikisis programs?

The funding support varies by program. Sunoikisis will sponsor one student to attend the Kenchreai Archaeological Fieldschool program and one or more students to participate in the internship program in Nafplion. The internship program in Washington, DC offers hourly wages and housing on campus. There are currently no scholarships for the January Term program or sources of funding available for the Undergraduate Research Sympoisa.

How can I join your mailing list?

Please contact us via the online form.

My question isn’t here. What can I do?

Please contact us via the online form.

Faculty

How much does Sunoikisis cost?

There is no membership fee for an institution or for faculty members to participate.

What the are obligations of participating faculty and institutions?

Faculty members participate in and sustain Sunoikisis in a variety of ways: for example, attending the planning workshops in June, leading a synchronous common session for one of the courses, creating a writing prompts for a weekly assignment, providing feedback on writing assignments, and evaluating student abstracts or other student coursework.

Can I use the materials I find on the website?

The materials are freely available for you to repurpose for your courses (synchronously or asynchronously). Sunoikisis has published them under a Creative Commons license that allows for non-commercial uses.

Who participates in Sunoikisis?

Faculty members from any institution — large or small — in the United States may participate. View the list of current faculty. View the list of previously and currently affiliated institutions.

What institutions are affiliated with Sunoikisis?

View the list of previously and currently affiliated institutions. View of the list of current participating faculty.

How do students receive credit for Sunoikisis courses?

Institutions that offer the courses to their own students—led by their own faculty—can decide to award credit. There must be a sponsoring faculty member for any student enrolled in a Sunoikisis course. Faculty have offered Sunoikisis courses both as regular classes and as independent studies, depending on student need. Issues of course credit are generally decided by an institution’s registrar; Sunoikisis faculty and directors would be happy to help discuss how to approach your registrar, dean, or provost about the awarding of institutional course credit.

How can I get my institution to recognize a Sunoikisis course?

Contact Professor Kenny Morrell or Professor Ryan Fowler via the online form to discuss ways to approach your department, provost/dean, or registrar about course credit for Sunoikisis courses.

How does the Sunoikisis program impact small departments?

The goal of Sunoikisis is to supplement small or under-resourced classics programs with classes and lectures that a one- or two-person department might not be able to offer under typical circumstances. The CHS and Sunoikisis will offer their resources, class materials, website assistance, and the support of the CHS/Harvard Fellow as long as each participating institution has a classicist ‘on the ground’ at the institution. In our experience, with the addition of these types of courses offered, and given contact with other professors and students at other institutions, student interest in classics increases at a dramatic rate. We have found that over time this increase in interest leads to more hires, as more classes are requested and student interest is given an opportunity to grow. Further, since it is often the case that 10 or more different instructors are responding to the work of students from all over the country, the possibility to compound a variety of perspectives and viewpoints is extraordinary. It is so rare for a student to have the opportunity to be in a classroom with two instructors at the same time—nevertheless six or more professors—and to be able to participate in such a conversation about a particular topic in classics in real time.

What happens at the course planning and faculty development seminars?

Ten professors from around the classics world gather every June. Since 2009, they have met at the Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC. Under the guidance of a senior course consultant, participants read and discuss primary and secondary literature over the three-day planning session. Each June, there are two seminars: one on a Greek topic (see course list) and another on a Latin topic (see course list); faculty may attend one or both seminars. The goal is to come out of each three-day seminar with a finished syllabus for the course scheduled in the cycle for that Fall term. In addition, instructors in small departments have the opportunity to converse and compare notes with classics colleagues in similar or interestingly dissimilar professional circumstances.

Who is eligible to participate in course planning and faculty development seminars?

Any faculty member may apply to participate in seminars. In attending a planning seminar, participants agree to: read and present the planning session materials; help in the creation of the syllabus, readings, and writing assignments for the course; and assist in the fall courses by giving a lecture and by assessing student coursework. Those instructors offering or teaching the particular course in the Fall will have priority over those not offering the course at their institution.

Is funding support available to faculty to participate in the course planning seminars?

Yes, faculty members who participate will receive a $500 honorarium. Sunoikisis does not offer a separate stipend for travel. (Housing and meals are also provided.)

My question isn’t here. What can I do?

Please contact us via the online form.

How can I join your mailing list?

Please contact us via the online form.

Seminar Participants

When is the next seminar?

Faculty will meet to plan advanced language courses for the fall 2016 semester at the Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, D.C. in June 2016.

When will the application be available?

The application and seminar descriptions will be available in January 2016.

Who is eligible to attend?

Any faculty member may apply to participate in the seminars. In attending a planning seminar, participants agree to: read and present the planning session materials; help in the creation of the syllabus, readings, and writing assignments for the course; and assist in the fall courses by giving a lecture and by assessing student coursework. Those instructors offering or teaching the particular course in the Fall will have priority over those not offering the course at their institution.

What is my specific contribution to the planning seminar?

The contribution and participation of each participant is essential to the success of this program. You will be asked to do a number of tasks including: evaluating and presenting on a translation for use in the course; presenting articles to the group; designing writing assignment prompts; choosing primary and secondary readings for the Fall course; and helping to develop the syllabus and common session topics. You will also be asked to lead a common session discussion during the Fall and provide feedback on student work during the course.

When will the planning seminar agenda be posted?

The course director will post the seminar agenda in May, one month before the seminar. That agenda will include readings to be done before the seminar starts.

When will the course syllabus be posted?

The course director will post the course syllabus in August, one month before the start of the fall courses.

What does a typical day look like?

A continental breakfast will be available in the dining area of the main building every morning at 8:00am. Lunch will be provided at the CHS from 12:30-1:30pm.

The daily schedule of the seminar will be:

8:00 – 9:00am Breakfast
9:00 – 10:30am Session 1
10:30 – 11:00am Break
11:00am – 12:30pm Session 2
12:30 – 2:00pm Lunch
2:00 – 3:30pm Session 3
3:30 – 4:00pm Break
4:00 – 5:30pm Session 4
6:30pm Dinner (at the CHS or out with the group)

Within each session, participants will discuss primary and secondary literature related to the topic of the course being offered. Often this includes presenting articles to the other participants, sometimes in a team, sometimes solo.

Arrangements for dinner and optional activities in the evening will vary from day to day, but your meals will be covered while you are attending a planning seminar.

How do I get to the Center for Hellenic Studies?

The CHS is accessible by car, train, or plane. The nearest train station is Union Station (3.5 miles away). The nearest airport is Reagan National Airport (7 miles); Dulles International Airport is also convenient to the CHS (28 miles).

The nearest metro station is Dupont Circle on the Red Line; the N2, N4, and N6 buses connect the CHS to Dupont Circle via Massachusetts Avenue. For more information, visit wmata.com.

Sunoikisis does not offer a stipend for travel; participants will receive a $500 honorarium as well as room and board.

Where can I park if I am driving?

There is free parking on the CHS campus.

What does the Center for Hellenic Studies provide?

The Center for Hellenic Studies provides all meals and housing on campus. Participants also receive a $500 honorarium.

Where will I be staying?

Participants will stay at the CHS in the following types of accommodations: guest rooms, each with a bathroom and kitchenette; a guest room with a bathroom and kitchenette; a guest suite with two bedrooms, two baths, and a full kitchen; studio apartments with full bathrooms and kitchens; duplex apartments, with two bedrooms, one bathroom and full kitchen; or a three-bedroom cottage with one and a half bathrooms, and full kitchen. Units with more than one bedroom will house multiple participants; however, participants will always have their own bedrooms.

What do I need to bring?

Please bring casual clothing, a laptop, and a cell phone.

Residences will be stocked with linens, basic toiletries (soap and shampoo), and complimentary food items (coffee, milk, bread and butter, fruit). There is a small refrigerator and coffeemaker in each facility. All units have wireless access to the internet and telephones, but participants will be unable to make long-distance calls.

Can I bring my family?

The CHS is unable to accommodate families due to limited space.

What funding is available to seminar participants?

Participants receive a $500 honorarium.

Is the CHS library available to seminar participants?

Yes, seminar participants may use the library but complete the online registration form. There is time allotted before and after the seminar for library use.

Will I have access to wireless internet?

Yes, the campus of the Center for Hellenic Studies has wireless internet in all housing units and in the main building.

Why do I need to sign a media release form before participating?

The Center for Hellenic Studies records video of the seminars for the Sunoikisis archives and for publication on the Sunoikisis website. By signing the media release, you are agreeing to be captured on video and to allow the CHS to publish the recording and to store a copy in the Sunoikisis archives at the CHS.

Course Consultant

What is expected of me before the seminar?

Before the seminar, and in conversation with the course director, the consultant selects primary literature (original and in translation) and secondary readings for the planning seminar participants to read, present, and discuss. This bibliography generally includes three types of work: the seminal articles and monographs that form the core of past and present interpretative work on the topic; selections that represent current scholarly trends; and works that present close readings of the texts we will be using in Fall. Consultants should consider the literature that will bring their colleagues up to date on the topic, as well as pieces that could be used with undergraduates; consultants are encouraged to include their own work among the selections. Course consultants will receive a copy of the seminar agendas and course syllabi from previous years as examples and models.

The particular direction the planning session will take is entirely up to the course consultant (for example, the centuries or specific themes covered in a Medieval Latin course; the choice between an Iliad-Odyssey-, and/or hymn-based Homer course, etc.).

Consultants will work with the Sunoikisis course director, who will direct the course in the Fall. Together, the consultant and the course director will develop the course’s focus, the primary and secondary readings that the participants will present (3-4 articles per person over the course of the three days), and the final agenda for the workshop. Then, the staff at the CHS will create a repository of online resources to support the workshop and course.

Since the agenda will need to be posted by May (a month before the planning sessions), the consultant should plan on having easy access to a library and e-mail during late March and April.

What is expected of me during the seminar?

During the seminar, the consultant facilitates the discussion by offering perspectives on the material and directing the attention of the participants to issues of significance for understanding the literature. Consultants are also encouraged to provide suggestions about the overall design of the course.

What is expected of me after the seminar?

After the seminar, the Sunoikisis faculty will invite the consultant to give a lecture during the Fall term (in accordance with the consultant’s schedule), participate in any aspect of the course during its run, as well as share scholarly viewpoints as a way of enriching participating students’ academic experiences.

What are my teaching requirements in the course for the fall?

The consultant will be invited to lead one synchronous session during the Fall term, as well as assign a writing prompt to the students before the session. Any feedback the consultant can provide participating students that week is both helpful and appreciated. The consultant is welcome to attend any common sessions, or respond to any forum posts at any time. Occasionally we have arranged for the consultant to visit one of the participating institutions to give a public lecture, which can double as his or her common session.

When will the seminar agenda be posted?

Collaborating with the consultant, the course director will post the seminar agenda in May, one month before the seminar.

When will the course syllabus be posted?

The course director will post the course syllabi in August, one month before the start of the fall courses.

How do I get to the Center for Hellenic Studies?

The CHS is accessible by car, train, or plane. The nearest train station is Union Station (3.5 miles away). The nearest airport is Reagan National Airport (7 miles); Dulles International Airport is also convenient to the CHS (28 miles).

The nearest metro station is Dupont Circle on the Red Line; the N2, N4, and N6 buses connect the CHS to Dupont Circle via Massachusetts Avenue. For more information, visit wmata.com.

The Center for Hellenic Studies covers the travel expenses of the course consultant.

What does the Center for Hellenic Studies provide?

The Center for Hellenic Studies provides all meals and housing on campus and covers the consultant’s travel expenses. In addition, the consultant will receive an honorarium of $3,000.

What does a typical day look like?

A continental breakfast will be available in the dining area of the main building every morning at 8:00am. Lunch will be provided at the CHS from 12:30-1:30pm.

The daily schedule of the seminar will be:

8:00 – 9:00am Breakfast
9:00 – 10:30am Session 1
10:30 – 11:00am Break
11:00am – 12:30pm Session 2
12:30 – 2:00pm Lunch
2:00 – 3:30pm Session 3
3:30 – 4:00pm Break
4:00 – 5:30pm Session 4
6:30pm Dinner (at the CHS or out with the group)

Arrangements for dinner and optional activities in the evening will vary from day to day.

Where will I be staying?

Participants will stay at the CHS in the following types of accommodations: guest rooms, each with a bathroom and kitchenette; a guest room with a bathroom and kitchenette; a guest suite with two bedrooms, two baths, and a full kitchen; studio apartments with full bathrooms and kitchens; duplex apartments, with two bedrooms, one bathroom and full kitchen; or a three-bedroom cottage with one and a half bathrooms, and full kitchen. Units with more than one bedroom will house multiple participants; however, participants will always have their own bedrooms.

What do I need to bring?

Please bring casual clothing, a laptop, and a cell phone.

Residences will be stocked with linens, basic toiletries (soap and shampoo), and complimentary food items (coffee, milk, bread and butter, fruit). There is a small refrigerator and coffeemaker in each facility. All units have wireless access to the internet and telephones, but participants will be unable to make long-distance calls.

Can I bring my family?

The CHS is unable to accommodate families due to limited space.

What funding is available for the seminar course consultant?

The course consultant receives a $3,000 honorarium. (Seminar participants receive a $500 honorarium.)

Is the CHS library available to the seminar course consultant?

The course consultant may use the library, but must complete the online registration form. There is time allotted before and after the seminar for library use.

Will I have access to wireless internet?

The campus of the Center for Hellenic Studies has wireless internet in all housing units and in the main building.

Why do I need to sign a media release form before participating?

The Center for Hellenic Studies records video of the seminars for the Sunoikisis archives and for publication on the Sunoikisis website. By signing the media release, you are agreeing to be captured on video and to allow the CHS to publish the recording and to store a copy in the Sunoikisis archives at the CHS.