Abstract — A Familiar Image: A Re-examination of Roma on Republican Denarii of the Middle Republic

Rome, between c. 211 BCE to the late 1st century BCE, produced the now-iconic “Roma” series of silver denarii. Numismatists and historians have traditionally identified the head as the Roman Goddess “Roma” in part because of the presence of the legend “Roma” and also in part because no other goddess or figure fully matches the … Read moreAbstract — A Familiar Image: A Re-examination of Roma on Republican Denarii of the Middle Republic

From the Ground Up: Archaeology and Landscape in the Xanthos Watershed

From the Ground Up: Archaeology and Landscape in the Xanthos Watershed §1 The Lycian region of Turkey possesses a multicultural history equally as rich as its landscape. Seton Lloyd describes the region in a traveler’s guide to ancient Turkey: “In the confines of this strange highland with its narrow approaches and elevated interior, an indigenous people, … Read moreFrom the Ground Up: Archaeology and Landscape in the Xanthos Watershed

Abstract – From the Ground Up: Archaeology and Landscape in the Xanthos Watershed

Kristin Otto and Genevieve Flynn, DePauw University Faculty mentor: Pedar Foss During the summer of 2013, Kristin Otto and Genevieve Flynn, students from DePauw University, accompanied classical studies professor Pedar Foss on a teaching and learning mission to the Lycian region of Turkey to consider how the peoples in the ancient Xanthos River watershed interacted … Read moreAbstract – From the Ground Up: Archaeology and Landscape in the Xanthos Watershed

Abstract – Interpreting the VMFA’s Düver Terracottas

In 1978, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts acquired a set of 15 terracotta panels found in Düver in the mid 60s. These pieces are labeled in the museum catalog simply as Phrygian in origin. However, these pieces display a variety of fabric colors that hint at a more international nature to their construction. This … Read moreAbstract – Interpreting the VMFA’s Düver Terracottas

Abstract – An Osteological and Historical Study of Three Roman Funerary Urns at the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum Collection

Lay attempts to provide information about the matter extracted from Roman funerary urns at the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum Collection. These urns date sometime between the first and third century CE, and were probably excavated from the necropolis on the Via Salaria. Roman funerary urns contained the cremated remains of human bones (cremains), but on … Read moreAbstract – An Osteological and Historical Study of Three Roman Funerary Urns at the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum Collection

Interpreting the VMFA’s Düver Terracottas

Introduction 1.1 In the mid-1960s, architectural terracotta pieces from the site of Düver in central Anatolia appeared for sale on the international art market. In 1978, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts acquired a set of these terracotta pieces, presumably from Düver, dated to the third quarter of the sixth century BCE (Mayo 1981).[.1] The … Read moreInterpreting the VMFA’s Düver Terracottas

An Osteological and Historical Study of Three Roman Funerary Urns at the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum Collection

1. Ancient Roman Cinerary Urns in Context §1.1 There are three Ancient Roman marble cinerary urns currently on display in the collection of the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum. [Image 1] These three urns, along with over a hundred Latin inscriptions, were purchased in Italy between the years 1905 and 1907 by Hopkins professor Harry Langford … Read moreAn Osteological and Historical Study of Three Roman Funerary Urns at the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum Collection

Abstract – A Pseudo-Panathenaic Amphora by the Nikoxenos Painter

The purpose of the research is to identify and explain all aspects of the design and iconography of the name vase of the Nikoxenos Painter, a red figure pseudo-Panathenaic amphora discovered in Capua. The Nikoxenos Painter was active between c. 525-475 B.C.E., the period during which the shift from black figure to red figure vase … Read moreAbstract – A Pseudo-Panathenaic Amphora by the Nikoxenos Painter

Abstract – Battle Sarcophagi in Ancient Rome: An Explanation for the Visual Differences Present of the Alexander, Portonaccio, Achilles and Penthesilea, and Ludovisi Sarcophagi

Over nearly six hundred years battle sarcophagi change compositionally and thematically. The Hellenistic Alexander sarcophagus (ca. 325-311 BC) represents a battle scene with empty space between figures. Approximately five hundred years later, this empty space is eliminated in the Roman Portonaccio sarcophagus (AD 180-190). The lack of space creates a more chaotic battle scene and … Read moreAbstract – Battle Sarcophagi in Ancient Rome: An Explanation for the Visual Differences Present of the Alexander, Portonaccio, Achilles and Penthesilea, and Ludovisi Sarcophagi

A Pseudo-Panathenaic Amphora by the Nikoxenos Painter

§1.1 A pseudo-panathenaic amphora in the David M. Robinson Collection at the University of Mississippi presents challenging questions about iconography and the viewer (Figure 1, Figure 2). I will begin to address these questions with a discussion of the history of the vase, a basic overview of its iconography and condition, a description of the … Read moreA Pseudo-Panathenaic Amphora by the Nikoxenos Painter