A Familiar Image: A Re-Examination of Roma on Republican Denarii of the Middle Republic

§i Between c. 211 BCE and the late 1st century BC, Rome produced the now-iconic “Roma” series of silver denarii. Numismatists and historians have traditionally identified the head represented on the coin as the Roman Goddess “Roma” in part because of the presence of the legend “Roma,” and also in part because no other goddess or figure … Read moreA Familiar Image: A Re-Examination of Roma on Republican Denarii of the Middle Republic

Nostalgia Inverted: The Golden Age Motif in Strepsiades’ Pre-Dramatic History

§i. Lines 43—45 of Aristophanes’ Clouds narrate events which occur before the play begins. Nevertheless, they prove to be significant instances of the playwright’s characteristic humor and dramatic construction. Within the passage, Strepsiades’ ἥδιστος βίος (43) evokes a peaceful Golden Age as traditionally conceived by the Greeks. At the same time, what Dover calls his … Read moreNostalgia Inverted: The Golden Age Motif in Strepsiades’ Pre-Dramatic History

Scandal and Political Divisions in the Late Roman Republic and Modern America

1. Introduction 1§1 In November 2014, when Republican senator Ted Cruz depicted Democratic President Barack Obama as Catiline, he created an allusion that was possibly more meaningful than he realized. The Catilinarian conspiracy of 63 BCE was a long stretch from the current immigration reform and The Affordable Care Act in America, by nature a … Read moreScandal and Political Divisions in the Late Roman Republic and Modern America

War and Peace in Sallust’s Bellum Catilinae

§1 Throughout Sallust’s Bellum Catilinae, war and peace appear together as a unit, a binary intrinsic to the Roman identity. A close investigation of these terms, their locations in the text, and their relation to the narrative reveals that war and peace are fundamental to the structure of Sallust’s work and his understanding of Roman culture. … Read moreWar and Peace in Sallust’s Bellum Catilinae

Abstract — War and Peace in Sallust’s Bellum Catilinae

This paper argues that in Sallust’s Bellum Catilinae the breakdown of a definitive cultural separation between war and peace has unleashed Catiline, a character emblematic of the unbridled force destroying the Roman system. The speeches and synkrisis of Caesar and Cato, then, represent Sallust’s attempt to correct the confusion of war and peace, friend and … Read moreAbstract — War and Peace in Sallust’s Bellum Catilinae

Abstract — Nostalgia Inverted: the Golden Age Motif in Strepsiades’ Pre-Dramatic History

K.J. Dover sketches the protagonists of Aristophanic comedy as figures of opposition who jeer against social custom, myth, public figures, and “all those who in one way or another are superior to [them]selves.”[1] My research applies Dover’s claim to lines 41-8 of Clouds, positing that Strepsiades’ “ἥδιστος βίος” (43) specifically reflects the traditional longing for … Read moreAbstract — Nostalgia Inverted: the Golden Age Motif in Strepsiades’ Pre-Dramatic History

Abstract — A Familiar Image: A Re-examination of Roma on Republican Denarii of the Middle Republic

Rome, between c. 211 BCE to the late 1st century BCE, produced the now-iconic “Roma” series of silver denarii. Numismatists and historians have traditionally identified the head as the Roman Goddess “Roma” in part because of the presence of the legend “Roma” and also in part because no other goddess or figure fully matches the … Read moreAbstract — A Familiar Image: A Re-examination of Roma on Republican Denarii of the Middle Republic

Abstract — Scandal and Political Divisions in Late Roman Republic and Modern America

In Sallust’s Bellum Catilinae, modern readers see the depiction of a dramatic conspiracy by one politician and his followers against another in Republican Rome. In my paper I argue that despite the centuries between Republican Rome and modern America, we see similar uses of scandals and conspiracies—such as Catiline’s personal and political ones—in contemporary American … Read moreAbstract — Scandal and Political Divisions in Late Roman Republic and Modern America

Looking to One Another: Common Knowledge and “Alignment” in the Navy of Democratic Athens

1. Introduction 1§1 From the late 480s until 322 BCE, Athens was both a democracy and a naval power.[1] These phenomena were not independent of one another, as Aristotle remarks: “the naval multitude, having been the cause of the victory at Salamis and thereby of the leadership of Athens due to her power at sea, made … Read moreLooking to One Another: Common Knowledge and “Alignment” in the Navy of Democratic Athens

Abstract – Societal Attitudes Toward Metics through the Lens of Aeschylus’ Suppliants and Euripides’ Children of Heracles

Victoria Roeck, University of Notre Dame Faculty mentor: Christopher Baron In this paper, I investigate societal attitudes toward metics (non-citizen resident aliens) in fifth-century B.C.E. Athens through the lens of Aeschylus’s Suppliants and Euripides’ Children of Heracles. The former, written around 461 B.C.E., illustrates that Athenians were suspicious of foreigners in their city and considered themselves superior, even … Read moreAbstract – Societal Attitudes Toward Metics through the Lens of Aeschylus’ Suppliants and Euripides’ Children of Heracles