Nostalgia Inverted: The Golden Age Motif in Strepsiades’ Pre-Dramatic History

§i. Lines 43—45 of Aristophanes’ Clouds narrate events which occur before the play begins. Nevertheless, they prove to be significant instances of the playwright’s characteristic humor and dramatic construction. Within the passage, Strepsiades’ ἥδιστος βίος (43) evokes a peaceful Golden Age as traditionally conceived by the Greeks. At the same time, what Dover calls his … Read moreNostalgia Inverted: The Golden Age Motif in Strepsiades’ Pre-Dramatic History

Subdivisions: The Containment of Femininity in Aristophanes’ Ecclesiazusae

§1 In the Ecclesiazusae, Aristophanes presents his audience with a radical political question: what would happen if the entire Athenian democracy were turned over to the women, and they became the custodians of the democracy rather than the men? As a comedic playwright, it is no wonder that Aristophanes’ answer to this scenario satirizes the … Read moreSubdivisions: The Containment of Femininity in Aristophanes’ Ecclesiazusae

Abstract — War and Peace in Sallust’s Bellum Catilinae

This paper argues that in Sallust’s Bellum Catilinae the breakdown of a definitive cultural separation between war and peace has unleashed Catiline, a character emblematic of the unbridled force destroying the Roman system. The speeches and synkrisis of Caesar and Cato, then, represent Sallust’s attempt to correct the confusion of war and peace, friend and … Read moreAbstract — War and Peace in Sallust’s Bellum Catilinae

Abstract — Nostalgia Inverted: the Golden Age Motif in Strepsiades’ Pre-Dramatic History

K.J. Dover sketches the protagonists of Aristophanic comedy as figures of opposition who jeer against social custom, myth, public figures, and “all those who in one way or another are superior to [them]selves.”[1] My research applies Dover’s claim to lines 41-8 of Clouds, positing that Strepsiades’ “ἥδιστος βίος” (43) specifically reflects the traditional longing for … Read moreAbstract — Nostalgia Inverted: the Golden Age Motif in Strepsiades’ Pre-Dramatic History

Abstract — Three of a Perfect Pair: The Fractured Feminine in Aristophanes’ Ecclesiazusae

In the Ecclesiazusae, Aristophanes presents his audience with a radical political question: what if the entire Athenian democracy were turned over to the women, and they became the custodians of the democracy rather than the men? As Zeitlin (1999) notes, the overall effect of this radical change is never fully explored, and thus it is … Read moreAbstract — Three of a Perfect Pair: The Fractured Feminine in Aristophanes’ Ecclesiazusae

Put a Cork in It: Martial and the Metaphor of Wine for Writing

Introduction 1§1 Wine and water often appear in Greek and Latin poetry as metaphors for writing. In fact, the act of writing would eventually be considered equivalent to drinking manly amounts of wine.[1] Early Hellenistic elegy includes a list of behaviors for symposiasts, which includes poking fun at each other just enough to produce laughter. … Read morePut a Cork in It: Martial and the Metaphor of Wine for Writing

Acrostic Authority in Germanicus’ Phaenomena

Maxwell J. Fabiszewski 1. Introduction 1§1 This inquiry suggests that Germanicus employs acrostics as sophisticated, didactic devices to develop his interest in catasterism, the placement of objects in the sky, and to complement his retelling of myth in his Latin Phaenomena. These acrostics may provide a better understanding of the poem, as they seem to … Read moreAcrostic Authority in Germanicus’ Phaenomena

Homer Multitext Project

Introduction Neel Smith 1§1 In this paper, we present some results of recent study of manuscripts of the Homer Multitext project. While individual sections of this paper were primarily the responsibility of one or two co-authors, we selected the progression of topics discussed here to illustrate three kinds of new discoveries that undergraduate contributors to … Read moreHomer Multitext Project

Dialect at Himera: An Evaluation of Material and Literary Evidence

Dialect at Himera: An Evaluation of Material and Literary Evidence Dan Plekhov Introduction 1§1 Thucydides’ account (6.3-5) of the history of the Hellenic settlements in Sicily is one that is more concerned with the foundations of these cities than their future roles in the Peloponnesian War. As such, he provides invaluable details regarding their foundations, specifically, the … Read moreDialect at Himera: An Evaluation of Material and Literary Evidence

Societal Attitudes Toward Metics in Fifth-Century Athens through the Lens of Aeschylus’s Suppliants and Euripides’ Children of Heracles

1§1 Fifth-century B.C.E. Athenians grouped themselves together based on citizenship. Metics, who were non-citizen resident aliens, found themselves excluded from many aspects of city life because they were not citizens. But how did Athenian citizens view the metics living among them? Aeschylus’ Suppliants reveals xenophobic attitudes toward metics among Athenians in the early fifth century B.C.E., … Read moreSocietal Attitudes Toward Metics in Fifth-Century Athens through the Lens of Aeschylus’s Suppliants and Euripides’ Children of Heracles