A Familiar Image: A Re-Examination of Roma on Republican Denarii of the Middle Republic

§i Between c. 211 BCE and the late 1st century BC, Rome produced the now-iconic “Roma” series of silver denarii. Numismatists and historians have traditionally identified the head represented on the coin as the Roman Goddess “Roma” in part because of the presence of the legend “Roma,” and also in part because no other goddess or figure … Read moreA Familiar Image: A Re-Examination of Roma on Republican Denarii of the Middle Republic

Abstract — Nostalgia Inverted: the Golden Age Motif in Strepsiades’ Pre-Dramatic History

K.J. Dover sketches the protagonists of Aristophanic comedy as figures of opposition who jeer against social custom, myth, public figures, and “all those who in one way or another are superior to [them]selves.”[1] My research applies Dover’s claim to lines 41-8 of Clouds, positing that Strepsiades’ “ἥδιστος βίος” (43) specifically reflects the traditional longing for … Read moreAbstract — Nostalgia Inverted: the Golden Age Motif in Strepsiades’ Pre-Dramatic History

Abstract — A Familiar Image: A Re-examination of Roma on Republican Denarii of the Middle Republic

Rome, between c. 211 BCE to the late 1st century BCE, produced the now-iconic “Roma” series of silver denarii. Numismatists and historians have traditionally identified the head as the Roman Goddess “Roma” in part because of the presence of the legend “Roma” and also in part because no other goddess or figure fully matches the … Read moreAbstract — A Familiar Image: A Re-examination of Roma on Republican Denarii of the Middle Republic

The Sorcerer Dionysus: Ancient Roots, a Foreign Image, Marginalized Followers, and the Divine Magician

The Sorcerer Dionysus: Ancient Roots, a Foreign Image, Marginalized Followers, and the Divine Magician[1] Kaia Lind 1. Introduction 1§1 Modern times have remembered Dionysus primarily as a god of wine and revelry. But that was just a small aspect of Dionysus in the ancient world. For the ancient Greeks, he was the god of madness, of … Read moreThe Sorcerer Dionysus: Ancient Roots, a Foreign Image, Marginalized Followers, and the Divine Magician

Morphing Monsters: The Evolution of Anguipede Giants

Introduction I§1 The Giants were a mythological race of mortals with great strength. The prevailing legend of the battle between the gods and the Giants was formulated in the Archaic epics and was expanded upon by many later writers including Psuedo-Apollodorus and Ovid. The battle between the gods and the Giants, the Gigantomachy, was a common … Read moreMorphing Monsters: The Evolution of Anguipede Giants

Abstract – The Sorcerer Dionysus: Ancient Roots, a Foreign Image, Marginalized Followers, and the Divine Magician

Dionysus, in all of his manifestations, is different from any other Olympian god. Taken all together, his unique characteristics add up to a consistent association with sorcery and magic. Specific factors contributing to his association with magic are: the long record of his written name in Greek history, his regular representation as a traveler from … Read moreAbstract – The Sorcerer Dionysus: Ancient Roots, a Foreign Image, Marginalized Followers, and the Divine Magician

Abstract – Morphing Monsters: The Evolution of Anguipede Giants

During the Hellenistic period the dominant artistic representations of the giants in the gigantomacy changed abruptly from humanoid to anguipede (snake-legged). One famous example is the Great Altar at Peragamon, built in the 2nd century BCE. This innovative representation seems at odds with Hesiod’s much earlier description of the giants in his Theogany from the … Read moreAbstract – Morphing Monsters: The Evolution of Anguipede Giants

Abstract – Nothing in Excess: Religious Moderation in Euripides’ Bacchae

In the Bacchae, Euripides uses the chorus to highlight the importance of religious moderation by providing the audience with distinct examples of ritual worship. At one end of the spectrum, Pentheus restricts the proper worship of Dionysus within Thebes and lashes out against the cult with violence. On the other end, the actions of the … Read moreAbstract – Nothing in Excess: Religious Moderation in Euripides’ Bacchae

Nothing in Excess: Religious Moderation in Euripides’ Bacchae

§1.1 In the Bacchae, Euripides uses the chorus to highlight the importance of religious moderation by providing the audience with distinct examples of ritual worship. At one end of the spectrum, Pentheus restricts the proper worship of Dionysus within Thebes and lashes out against the cult with violence. On the other end, the actions of … Read moreNothing in Excess: Religious Moderation in Euripides’ Bacchae

Social Responses to Female Agricultural Ritual and “Aischrologia”

§1.1 This paper further explores ideas parallel to those of Laurie O’Higgins concerning women’s communication in private settings. Drawing from J. C.Scott, who studies peasant resistance through folk culture, [1] she typifies Athenian women of the Classical age as, in general, a group ruled by men, but who received certain freedoms in the private space of religious … Read moreSocial Responses to Female Agricultural Ritual and “Aischrologia”