The Societal and Intellectual Barriers to a Unified Microbial Theory in Ancient Greece and Rome

Written by Miranda Ginder Introduction 1§1 Microbiology, as it is today, seems to be a modern creation beginning with Antonie van Leeuwenhoek. He peered into his self-built microscope at pond water and observed microbial life, which he called ‘animalcules’[1] However, since the time of the Presocratics, the invisible world of microorganisms has been imagined theoretically … Read moreThe Societal and Intellectual Barriers to a Unified Microbial Theory in Ancient Greece and Rome

The Shifting Importance of Animals for the Ancient Medical Practitioner

Written by Shannon Johnson-Finn 1§1 The understanding of animals changed drastically throughout antiquity. Civilizations around the Mediterranean held different animals in prestige, which effected how they acquired medical knowledge.[1] Shifts in the cultural understanding and importance of animals abstracted the relationships of the medical dissector, examiner, scientist and the animal.[2] This shift in importance and … Read moreThe Shifting Importance of Animals for the Ancient Medical Practitioner

The Term ἄτη as it Denotes Depressive μελαγχολία: The Two Aspects of μελαγχολία in Classical Texts

Written by Maya C. Locker Introduction 1§1 The difference between the two forms of μελαγχολία (melancholia) as referred to by Classical Greek authors, depressive and manic, are unclear because both aspects are rarely included and explored in a singular medical text (Kazantzidis 245). Depressive μελαγχολία relates to “a pathological state of lasting sadness” while manic … Read moreThe Term ἄτη as it Denotes Depressive μελαγχολία: The Two Aspects of μελαγχολία in Classical Texts

Regulating the human genes in antiquity: Plato’s and Aristotle’s Eugenics

Written by Triet Nguyen Introduction 1§1 Ancient medicine involves not only the study of diseases and their treatments but also eugenics, attempts to artificially regulate and better the human gene pool. Although the term eugenics was not coined until 1883, the concept had been conceived by the ancient Greek philosophers Plato and Aristotle millennia ago. … Read moreRegulating the human genes in antiquity: Plato’s and Aristotle’s Eugenics

The Concept of Heredity: The Pre-Socratics through Galen

Written by Alex Pinsk 1§1 “[A] phlegmatic person [may] be born of a phlegmatic” according to Hippocrates who made this first revolutionary observation of its kind. Heredity is understood in greater detail today than it ever has been in the past; however, rarely is its timeline traced back to its primary origins. Medical theories changed … Read moreThe Concept of Heredity: The Pre-Socratics through Galen

Galenic Medicine: The beginning of the formation of pediatric medicine

Written by Yiting Liu Part one: The body of infants and children before adolescent 1§1 In Hygiene, Galen defined medicine and health, explaining that the medicine can be divided into two parts: hygiene and therapeutics. Health is the balanced state of organic parts: cold, hot, dry and wet, determined by their number, magnitude and conformation. … Read moreGalenic Medicine: The beginning of the formation of pediatric medicine

The Nature of Healing at the Epidaurian Asklepieion

Written by Jonas Tai Introduction 1§1 Within the Temple of Asklepios at Epidauros, enkoimêsis (ἐγκοίμησις), a form of sleep incubation, was the practice by which the god himself would supposedly manifest within dreams to heal his ailing patients.[1] Stories of these miraculous healings were documented in the iamata, a set of inscriptions memorializing Asklepios’ exploits. … Read moreThe Nature of Healing at the Epidaurian Asklepieion

Heavenly Haircuts & Missing Bodies: An Examination of Berenice’s Absence from within Callimachus’ “Coma Berenices”

1§1 The narrative, fantasy, and representation of Berenice II continue to provide a sense of mystery and intrigue. In the third century BCE, Callimachus forever repositioned perceptions and receptions of the queen with his poem Lock of Berenice. In the fragments of the original Greek text that survive,[1] there remains a tangible tension between the … Read moreHeavenly Haircuts & Missing Bodies: An Examination of Berenice’s Absence from within Callimachus’ “Coma Berenices”

An Unidentifiable Icon: Nikolaos Gyzis

1§1 Some artists defy all artistic labels. They bounce from named style to named style, never staying long enough to fully earn the title of adherent. These artists synthesize the various styles they experiment with into their own, distinctive, unnameable style. Of this group, few can be called the defining artist of their generation. Even … Read moreAn Unidentifiable Icon: Nikolaos Gyzis

The Writing on the Walls: Reading the Sexual Passivity of the Women of Herculaneum

1§1 Ancient graffiti– drawings and text inscribed onto the face of a wall– are increasingly acknowledged as valuable sources for studying the daily lives of the ancients. Unlike monumental inscriptions or political programmata, graffiti are imbued with immediacy and do not require an intermediary writer to convey a person’s sentiments. For these reasons, graffiti offer … Read moreThe Writing on the Walls: Reading the Sexual Passivity of the Women of Herculaneum