Volume 4

The Sunoikisis consortium has presented an undergraduate symposium nearly every year since 2003. On Saturday, March 5, the Center for Hellenic Studies continued the tradition by hosting the 2016 Sunoikisis Undergraduate Research Symposium workshop.

The symposium followed a workshop format in which the authors shared their research and received feedback in a roundtable discussion.

The participating students also received feedback in advance of the symposium on their abstracts, annotated bibliographies, and paper drafts. A week before the workshop, the authors pre-circulated their papers and, using CommentPress, faculty members and fellow participants started discussions online through annotations. If one student asked a question or pointed out a problem area in her own paper, other participants would reply with ideas and suggestions. The students’ familiarity with each others’ work set the stage for the fruitful discussion during the one-day workshop.

All eight papers in the 2016 symposium concerned Greek 4th century literature or Latin literature of the Neronian Period, topics which correspond to the fall 2015 Greek and Latin courses offered by Sunoikisis.


Papers

“Liar, Liar, Rome on Fire! Seneca’s Philosophy of Deception”
William C Brown III, Washington and Lee University
Paper

“Gettin’ Jiggy With It: Writing Sex in the Philomela’s Daughter Episode of the Satyrica”
Benjamin Cail, Skidmore College
Paper

“The Threatening Pardon: Moderation, Mercy, and Cruelty in the Political Writings of Machiavelli and Seneca”
Noah Dovre, Concordia University
Paper

“The Tragic Burp: Satire in Seneca’s Thyestes”
Douglas Hill, CUNY
Paper

“The New Social Order:  The Portrayal of Freedmen in the Satyrica”
Khang Le, Akidmore College
Paper

“How the Status and Art of the Roman Freedman Complicate Petronius’s Trimalchio”
Rebecca Morris, Washington and Lee University
Paper

“The Motif of Cannibalism in the Metamorphoses and Thyestes”
Mary Beth Smith, Washington and Lee University
Paper

“’Uelocitate pensant moram’: Rhetoric and Intertextuality in Seneca’s Natural Questions 3–4a”
Michael Swantek, Oberlin College
Paper


Editorial Board

Ronnie Ancona, CUNY
Michael Arnush, Skidmore College
Rebecca Benefiel, Washington and Lee University
Heather Gruber, Concordia University
Christopher Trinacty, Oberlin College


Editorial Assistants

Emily Kohut, Post-Baccalaureate Fellow, Center for Hellenic Studies
Caroline Sandri, George Washington University